go: search | analyze | give feedback | references | terms | tree | partonomy | pulse | about / how to cite
mx id: 1094 | OBO id: HAO:0000716 | URI: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/HAO_0000716
phragma
Defined (both definition and relationships must be met)
Definition:
The antecosta that corresponds to the site of attachment of the dorsal longitudinal muscles in the thorax.
written by: Miko, I. 2009. -2019 Curator. Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology.

Relationships / properties:
The phragma is a antecosta.
The phragma is part of the body segment. The phragma is part of the cuticle. The phragma is part of the sclerite. The phragma is part of the thoracic segment.

Label usage (sensu)
phragma by Miko, I. 2009. -2019 Curator. Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology.
phragma by Snodgrass, R. E. 1935. Principles of insect morphology. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York & London 667 pp.
Comments and tags
alternative definition added almost 10 years ago by Istvan Miko
An internal ridge or projection of the body wall to which muscles are attached.
  Reference: Gibson , G. A. P., J. D. Read , and R. Fairchild. 1998. Chalcid wasps (Chalcidoidea): illustrated glossary of positional and morphological terms ..
  Cross reference: None provided.

alternative definition added about 8 years ago by Istvan Miko
The flange that serves as the site of attachment of the longitudinal flight muscle.
  Reference: Miko, I. 2009. -2019 Curator. Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology.
  Cross reference: None provided.

alternative definition added over 10 years ago by Istvan Miko
  Reference: Ronquist, F., and G. Nordlander. 1989. Skeletal morphology of an archaic cynipoid, Ibalia rufipes (Hymenoptera: Ibaliidae). Entomologica Scandinavica, Supplement 33:1-60.
  Cross reference: None provided.

alternative definition added about 13 years ago by Andy Deans
plate-like apodemal lobes of the antecostae of the mesonotum, metanotum, and first abdomenal tergum; the second and third carried by the postnotal plates of the pterothorax when he latter are separated from the following terga to which they normally belong
  Reference: Snodgrass, R. E. 1935. Principles of insect morphology. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York & London 667 pp.
  Cross reference: None provided.


Search again
You must select a result from the list before clicking show